Camera Troubles – Part 4

With this basic knowledge we have built on the human Eye and how the camera lens was designed from the model of the Eye, I would like to venture into some observations of human vision.

Again please take note of my disclaimer from Camera Troubles, “I am not an Optometrist”, so I am not attempting to prove anything for or against medical science but observing our ability and capability.

We have some magnificent capabilities to see detail in deep shadows while focused on well-lit objects. It is in fact this ability that I find most fascinating, because I have tried to  figure out whether I had looked into the shadows subconsciously noting the detail or if I am seeing that wide a spectrum of detail. In either case, the ability to see the wide range of detail in light or shade is a characteristic that I have not yet found innate within a camera, but I find it most common in creatively thinking people.

There are some ways to achieve the look of detail in shadow while focusing on the lit focal point. Before going to the topic of how the camera see a scene, we would do well to better understand what and how we see.

I have a hard time discerning the varying degrees of light and how well the area is lit where I am shooting. This I know from experience and so now I take some test pictures before getting into the heat of the photo shoot. This tells me some amazing things about my Eye sight. The Iris opening so wide that I do not notice the slight shadows between light fixtures and my Brain filling-in details of the wall paneling. We have an awesome device in our Brain to automatically fill-in such detail! Thank God for giving us such magnificence to be used and shared!

Now we have not discussed the process in-depth of taking the photo after exposure from the Sensor to Storage. So in the next posts in this series, I plan to explore “The Data Transfer” and “What the camera sees of what I do.”

Safety in Numbers

It is always best to have a back-up plan for any course of action! Do not worry, this is not to confess a lack of confidence in your own preferred plan, but rather an insightful precaution to ensure a productive outcome. What is the old adage? “There is safety in numbers.”

There are so many ways that we communicate and each method requires an ability to communicate with numbers. Even in the simple phrase “A picture is worth a thousand words” numbers are used to express the strength of the picture’s composition.

Creatively speaking, there are two numbers in the phrase “A picture is worth a thousand word”, whether obvious or implied. Did you catch them? Those words are “A” and “a thousand”. Yes “A” is repeated but the second usage is to specify how many “thousand”. “A” is to refer to a single image or “1”. I bring this up in an attempt show that it is not necessary to “shoot” literal numbers, but looking creatively at our surroundings for the number we are looking to find.

Numbers can be a fun way of taking some “time off” and focusing on a totally different subject rather than the same subject day after day. I have mentioned “stay-cations” before in this series of posts as a way to “get away” and relax from the daily routine; so enjoy your stay “away” from your “routine”.

Perhaps three is your number, you could start your adventure with a picture of three fingers on one hand, three leaves of a tree or three people walking on the beach. The possibilities are endless!

Enjoy and remember the safety rule, “There is safety in numbers!”