Personality

Have you ever been around people who always make you feel welcome and valuable? They just seem to exude an appreciation for your company, a genuine interest in your thoughts and statements.

Some people would call them a “Type A” personality.

There are times that I see the personality of the subject perfectly captured in a photo. I take a long, hard look at those pictures while asking myself questions similar to the following:

  1. What element say “personality” to me?
  2. Why do these elements communicate “personality” to me?
  3. How can I re-create the element?
  4. How can I distinguish between elements and the personalities they portray?
  5. What color tones were used?
  6. How do the color tones in this photo add to the subject’s personality?
  7. What clothing colors bring out subject personality?

As you can see there are a lot of things that can add to or take away from personality. In the blog post “Simplifying The Message” I mention that it is important to keep the message uncluttered and intentional. It is possible the only thing that shouts “personality” is the pose they assume as the shutter opens. Sometimes the simplest things are what makes the shot rather than the complicated set-up or costuming.

There are a lot of options at your disposal when displaying personality and be free to explore them!

Location, Location, Location! Part 2

Do you ever get surprised by something unintended in a photo but brings it up a step from good to superb? This post is something along those lines.

I have been working on textures for sometime, and while on a shoot I captured some textures that made the photo complete. I did not even notice what I had done until I was editing the photos!

This illustration is a half step behind by the fact that the added texture was unintentional, but for what it lacks, it fills in by demonstrating how texture can fit so well into a photo.

As I took the photo, I wanted to be sure to capture the free-standing display board and materials on the table. The tiled entry way and support column provide an unassuming background that brings an inviting warmth to the photo. The texture of the tile, is not over powering or out-of-place, but just enough that it almost makes the viewer feel secure and sure-footed.

I say that this was unintentional, when the whole truth is; I wanted this idea which we have discussed, communicated in the photo but did not fully see the environment which was to be captured.

My focus is texture. Using this post and its previous counter-part as an example you can use the very same principles to bring other elements into your photos! Have fun with it and the learning process. Remember: mistakes are a sign of improvement! Learning to walk means a possibility of falling, but getting up again to carry on is the vital attitude for success!