Thank You!

The end of August and this beginning of September is a mile-stone for Foetoss Light | Photography blog; we are celebrating our first year and all of its successes!

Thank you for your wonderful support! Your “like”s and comments have given me encouragement and inspiration for the service we have provided this last year and we want to improve our service! Your support is appreciated, seen and used!

We are working on expanding our services through the blog in this next year, which will provide you with precise information on specific consumer and professional cameras, settings and functions; brand comparisons and service connections.

Another mile-stone we achieved is our 80th post! Last Friday, September 8, was our 80th post and we look forward to many more.

I will say this; when creating two posts a week, it can be nerve wracking when trying to make certain this is not a “duplicate post”. I have learned that duplication has higher probability of occurring when I stop learning. I understand that I write from what I know and use, but without the continual learning and applying that education I will begin repeating myself. Thank you for your continuing interest! Because of your interest I am encouraged to continue learning and sharing it all with you!

In the last quarter we have been read in 33 countries and close to 2,000 post views. I see this as a huge spring board to use in propelling us to a whole new level. Are you ready? Stay tuned and I will give you the “heads-up” as we take each step in this next year.

Camera Troubles – Part 5

There is one more part of the human Eye and camera that we have not covered. This is the process of the Data Transfer from the Sensor to the Storage media via the Processor.

The Data Transfer:

The human capability for vision is amazing because we think we understand it enough to duplicate the process, only to realize our duplication is much less efficient than our inspiration.

As soon as our Retina receives the light of our surroundings, beginning to send the neurological impulses to the Optic Nerve there is a process of Data Transfer initiated. The amazing thing about this Data Transfer is the amount of detail that can be recalled, or amounts of certain information which one can be trained to receive and recall.

Illustration of information recall: Military branches train their personnel to acquire a target and discern in an instant if it is friendly or hostile. After an operation, begin the reports from each member and with it the lists of information that is most important; number of personnel on the operation, enemy patrols encountered, branches to which the patrols are affiliated, shots fired, number of injuries…etc. There is a lot of information to take in with precious little time to do so. This information is primarily accumulated by sight and secondarily with the other 4 human senses.

The same for public servants. Police officers require the use of sight in making reports besides assessing the threat to the public and their own safety. Paramedics make reports with vital statistics of a patient from many different senses at the same time. Firemen and women are trained to take verbal queues before getting to the scene of an emergency to take their own assessment of the situation.

This is all gathering data. These mentioned public servants and military are trained not just to gather information but to recall it for the purpose of reporting the events as they happened. This Data is what I draw upon in likening it to the Data a camera receives.

When the sequence in a camera is initiated, the light received by the Sensor is converted into Data which is transferred  across thin metal conductors. However, here is where Data loss becomes a problem. The Sensor is made up of millions of little pixels which receive light. There is not adequate space to give each pixel its own dedicated metal conductor for Data Transfer, so there ends up being about 100,000 or more pixels attached to 1 metal conductor lead.

Even still it is incredible that with so much Data being Transferred there is not more Data loss in digital cameras.

In the next and last post for the “Camera Troubles” series, we will discuss the specifics of the digital camera limitations so that we can learn to capture the detail we want.